Indo-US Research Fellowship Awards: 2009

Indo-US Research for Indian Researchers

Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC) of Department of Science and Technology, Govt. of India and Indo-US Science & Technology Forum (IUSSTF) committed to the common goal of promoting science and technology through devised programs and to nurture contacts between scientists and technologists at an early career stage jointly launch the Indo-US Research Fellowship Program for Indian Researchers. The objective of the Indo-US Research Fellowship Program for Indian Researchers is to introduce scientists and engineers in the early stages of their careers to international collaborative research opportunities, thereby furthering their research capacity and global perspective and forging long-term relationships with scientists, technologists and engineers in USA.

These awards will provide an excellent opportunity to young Indian scientists and technologists of all disciplines, under the age of 40 years to interact with the American scientific community and get first hand information of the developments taking place at the international level and acquaint themselves with new scientific research methods and to collaborate in a larger research project. It will enable young Indian researchers to carry out a clearly defined research project at a place of their choice in USA upto a period of 12 months. The individual availing this fellowship would be called as an IUSSTF Research Fellow.

Eligibility Criteria for Indo-US Research Fellowship

Academic Qualifications:

Master’s degree in engineering, technology or equivalent or Ph.D. in science or technology or equivalent or M.D. degree in medicine or equivalent.

Applicants must provide proof of independent research work in internationally recognized academic journals.

Age: Upto 40 years as on 31 December 2009

Employment: A permanent position in a public funded R&D lab/ S&T institution (non-private)/ recognized universities/colleges in India

Area of Work: Area proposed by the candidate should be clearly defined as:

(i) Atmospheric and Earth Sciences
(ii) Chemical Sciences
(iiii) Engineering Sciences
(iv) Life Sciences
(v) Medical Sciences
(vi) Mathematical and Computational Sciences
(vii) Physical Sciences

Promising applications in areas other than the above areas may also be considered.

Place of work: The fellow should be accepted by the US scientific/technological institution, which is internationally recognized as an outstanding institution where major work in the identified area is in progress. There should be willingness on the part of the American institution to accept and extend necessary support to the candidate for the work proposed.

The candidate should himself/herself correspond with their proposed host institution abroad for placement. Candidate is required to produce evidence, in the form of a letter of acceptance from the US institution to be visited along with merits/uniqueness of that host institute in the proposed area.

Note: The candidates who have availed any other overseas fellowship to USA for a period of more than three months through any Government/public funding agency during last two years will also not be considered for this fellowship.

Fellowship:
“The IUSSTF Fellow will be entitled to fellowship amount of US $ 3000 per month.”

“IUSSTF Fellow will also be entitled to a personal contingency grant of upto a maximum of Rs. 50,000 to cover for visa, airport transfer, medical insurance etc. Medical insurance expenses, visa fee, airport transfer charges will be met by the fellow from out of this personal contingency grant.”

IUSSTF Fellow will also be permitted to travel within USA to attend conferences or visit other institutes of interest with the approval of the advisor at the host institute. The Fellow will be entitled to avail one of the following grants for this purpose.
i) Grant of $ 600 for fellowship period upto 6 months
ii) Grant of $ 1200 for fellowship period beyond 6 months

Air-tickets for all the selected IUSSTF Fellow would be provided directly by the IUSSTF travel desk by economy class and shortest route from their place of work in India to the place of the American host institute and back. As a rule, reimbursements will not be provided for air tickets purchased directly.

Rules governing payment of salary, leave, medical, gratuity, GPF and pension etc. of the organization/ institution/ university to which the fellow belongs would continue to be applicable. No liability on any of these accounts will be borne by IUSSTF.

The candidate selected for the award of the Indo-US fellowship should commence their research with six month period from the date of award announcement. Failure to do so would render the fellow forfeit the award.

Application Guidelines

1.  Application should be submitted in the prescribed format
2.  Application should not be more than 20 pages maximum including CVs
3.  Application should be forwarded through the head of organization/ department where the candidate is employed
4.  Scanned copy of acceptance letter from host institution in USA

Application should be submitted electronically as single word/ pdf file to:
Indo-US Science and Technology Forum (IUSSTF)
Email:
fellowship@indousstf.org

For immediate answers to your queries, please contact:
Dr. Smriti Trikha
Indo-US Science and Technology Forum
12 Hailey Road, Fulbright House
New Delhi- 110 001
Ph: 91-11-42691700; Fax: 91-11-23321552

Submission deadline: 31 December 2009

IUSSTF Third Call for Proposals 2009

The Indo-US Science and Technology Forum (IUSSTF), established under an agreement between the Governments of India and the United States of America, is an autonomous, not for profit society that promotes and catalyses the Indo-US bilateral collaborations in science, technology, engineering and biomedical research through substantive interaction among government, academia and industry.

The IUSSTF seeks to support innovative programs aimed to stimulate interactions that have a strong potential for generating follow-on activities and building long term Indo-US S&T relationships. The IUSSTF promotes program that nurtures contacts between the young and mid career scientists and technologists and fosters active public-private partnership in R&D.

The IUSSTF solicits proposals thrice a year (submission deadline – February, June, October) jointly submitted by the US and Indian Principal Investigators from academia, government institutions/laboratories and private R&D entities for:

  • Knowledge R&D networked and Public–Private networked Indo-US centres
  • Indo-US workshops, conferences, symposium
  • Training program/advance schools
  • Travel grants

Detailed format available at http://www.indousstf.org

Get up close with innards of human body

Get up close with innards of human body with these amazing 3D-body shots.

All of the following images were captured using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), a type of electron microscope that uses a beam of high-energy electrons to scan surfaces of images.

The electron beam of the SEM interacts with atoms near or at the surface of the sample to be viewed, resulting in a very high-resolution, 3D-image.

Magnification levels range from x 25 (about the same as a hand lens) to about x 250,000.  Incredible details of 1 to 5 nm in size can be detected.

Blood Cell

1. They look like little cinnamon candies here, but they’re actually the most common type of blood cell in the human body – red blood cells (RBCs). These biconcave-shaped cells have the tall task of carrying oxygen to our entire body; in women there are about 4 to 5 million RBCs per micro liter (cubic millimeter) of blood and about 5 to 6 million in men. People who live at higher altitudes have even more RBCs because of the low oxygen levels in their environment.

Split End of Human Hair

2. Regular trimmings to your hair and good conditioner should help to prevent this unsightly picture of a split end of a human hair.

Purkinje neurons

3. Of the 100 billion neurons in your brain. Purkinje neurons are some of the largest. Among other things, these cells are the masters of motor coordination in the cerebellar cortex. Toxic exposure such as alcohol and lithium, autoimmune diseases, genetic mutations including autism and neurodegenerative diseases can negatively affect human Purkinje cells.

Hair Cell in the Ear

4. Here is what it looks like to see a close-up of human hair cell stereo cilia inside the ear. These detect mechanical movement in response to sound vibrations.

Blood Vessels Emerging from the Optic Nerve

5. In this image, stained retinal blood vessels are shown to emerge from the black-colored optic disc. The optic disc is a blind spot because no light receptor cells are present in this area of the retina where the optic nerve and retinal blood vessels leave the back of the eye.

Tongue with Taste Bud

6. This colour-enhanced image depicts a taste bud on the tongue. The human tongue has about 10,000 taste buds that are involved with detecting salty, sour, bitter, sweet and savoury taste perceptions.

Tooth Plaque

7. Brush your teeth often because this is what the surface of a tooth with a form of “corn-on-the-cob” plaque looks like.

Blood Clot

8. Remember that picture of the nice, uniform shapes of red blood cells you just looked at? Well, here’s what it looks like when those same cells get caught up in the sticky web of a blood clot. The cell in the middle is a white blood cell.

Alveoli in the Lung

9. This is what a colour-enhanced image of the inner surface of your lung looks like. The hollow cavities are alveoli; this is where gas exchange occurs with the blood.

Lung Cancer Cellsl

10. This image of warped lung cancer cells is in stark contrast to the healthy lung in the previous picture.

Villi of Small Intestine

11. Villi in the small intestine increase the surface area of the gut, which helps in the absorption of food. Look closely and you’ll see some food stuck in one of the crevices.

Human eggs with coronal cells

12. This image is of a purple, colour-enhanced human egg sitting on a pin. The egg is coated with the zona pellicuda, a glycoprotein that protects the egg but also helps to trap and bind sperm. Two coronal cells are attached to the zona pellicuda.

Sperm on the Surface of a Human Egg

13. Here’s a close-up of a number of sperm trying to fertilize an egg.

Human Embryo and Sperm

14. It looks like the world at war, but it’s actually five days after the fertilisation of an egg, with some remaining sperm cells still sticking around. This fluorescent image was captured using a confocal microscope. The embryo and sperm cell nuclei are stained purple while sperm tails are green. The blue areas are gap junctions, which form connections between the cells.

Source: Gconnect

BrainNavigator

ELSEVIER in collabration of ALLEN INSTITUTE FOR BRAIN SCIENCE, developed a wonderful tool for Brain Researchers.

With BrainNavigator, you’ll gain 24/7 access to  powerful 3D brain interactive software tool that helps further research in the neurosciences.

Neuroscientists and educators will experience a one-stop shop for brain research, structure analysis and education.

Kindly check the link:

www.brainnav.com/info to register for a free trial

http://elsatglabs.com/bnmicrosite/home.html

In addition, vast library of widely respected and referenced brain publications will provide a plethora of information on the most current brain research available.

Nano Science and Technology Consortium

The Nano Science and Technology Consortium works to create a platform conducive for the growth, promotion and partnering in the field of Nano Science and Technology taking together industries, academics and government through consultative, advisory and educative processes which will provide growth platform for organizations, academics and governments for harnessing the Nano potential at Global level.
NSTC is a non governmental, industry managed and promoted organization with a role of facilitator for Nano Developmental processes.
It is supported by academic and industry experts aimed at developing a platform for real-time strategic collaboration between academic, corporate, government and private labs, entrepreneurs, investors and service providers in order to harness the benefits of advances in areas such as Nanotechnology, Advanced materials, Nano manufacturing, Electronics, Medicine, Health care, Environment, Energy and Biotechnology that have been enabled by scientific breakthroughs.
NSTC by objective associates Companies, Universities, Research Institutions and work closely for enhancing the opportunities in the area of Nanotechnology and emerging new applications for the benefit of human race.

Link: Distance Participation Programs

Paper Diagnostics – Emerging Technology of 2009

Diagnostic tools that are cheap to make, simple to use, and rugged enough for rural areas could save thousands of lives in poor parts of the world. To make such devices, Harvard University professor George Whitesides is coupling advanced micro-fluidics with one of humankind’s oldest technologies: paper. The result is a versatile, disposable test that can check a tiny amount of urine or blood for evidence of infectious diseases or chronic conditions.

The finished devices are squares of paper roughly the size of postage stamps. The edge of a square is dipped into a urine sample or pressed against a drop of blood, and the liquid moves through channels into testing wells. Depending on the chemicals present, different reactions occur in the wells, turning the paper blue, red, yellow, or green. A reference key is used to interpret the results.

paper Diagnostics
Color change: Paper tests, such as those shown here, could make it possible to diagnose a range of diseases quickly and cheaply. A small drop of liquid, such as blood or urine, wicks in through the corner or back of the paper and passes through channels to special testing zones. Substances in these zones react with specific chemicals in the sample to indicate different conditions; results show up as varying colors. These tests are small, simple, and inexpensive.

The squares take advantage of paper’s natural ability to rapidly soak up liquid­s, thus circumventing the need for pumps and other mechanical components common in microfluidic devices. The first step in building the devices is to creat­e tiny channels, about a millimete­r in width, that direct the fluid to the test wells.

Paper is ­easily incinerated, making it easy to safely dispose of used tests. And while paper-based diagnostics (such as pregnancy tests) already exist, Whitesides­’s device is unique: a single square can perform many reactions, giving it the potential to diagnose a range of conditions. Meanwhile, its small size means that blood tests require only a tiny sample, allowing a user to simply prick a finger.

Check this MIT site for more details

http://gconnect.in/gc/technology/paper-diagnostics-emerging-technology-of-2009.html